Success stories

An affordable apartment in her hometown means Rita Landry can live independently and comfortably.
"When I can inspire other people to match what I’ve given, it just makes me feel like we’ve accomplished so much more."
"Lean" describes more than the meat at Brookford Farm, where Luke Mahoney has embraced progressive business practices.
Earning fixed-rate interest while supporting N.H. people and organizations was the solution for the Monadnock Folklore Society.
Stony Brook Estates' 2014 conversion to resident ownership kept homes affordable for its retirees.
The care and services she received at Keystone Hall's Transitional Living Center turned Laurie Goguen's life around. Financing from the Community Loan Fund made it possible for more to follow in her footsteps.
April Levin wanted life insurance. Not the kind that cashed out when she died. The kind that would improve her life and those of her sons while she was still very much alive. She wanted a college degree.
Jane and Peter McLaughlin of Lyme first invested in the New Hampshire Community Loan Fund in 2009. Their investment earns interest along with an "intangible dividend"--the knowledge that their money “is being used for all the right purposes.”
Ben's Maple Products and Abigail's Bakery are just two of the businesses that have benefited from working with consultants through the Farm Food Initiative.
Child care and early-education programs operate on paper-thin profit margins, yet must remain affordable to working families. The Business of Child Care Initiative helps directors sharpen their business skills.