Success stories

The care and services she received at Keystone Hall's Transitional Living Center turned Laurie Goguen's life around. Financing from the Community Loan Fund made it possible for more to follow in her footsteps.
April Levin wanted life insurance. Not the kind that cashed out when she died. The kind that would improve her life and those of her sons while she was still very much alive. She wanted a college degree.
Jane and Peter McLaughlin of Lyme first invested in the New Hampshire Community Loan Fund in 2009. Their investment earns interest along with an "intangible dividend"--the knowledge that their money “is being used for all the right purposes.”
Ben's Maple Products and Abigail's Bakery are just two of the businesses that have benefited from working with consultants through the Farm Food Initiative.
Child care and early-education programs operate on paper-thin profit margins, yet must remain affordable to working families. The Business of Child Care Initiative helps directors sharpen their business skills.
Abigail Easterly and Scott Silberfeld felt a huge disconnect between their deeply held values and the behavior of the corporations where their money was invested. It wasn’t a comfortable feeling. Then they found the New Hampshire Community Loan Fund.
The New Hampshire Community Loan Fund's Business Finance team made three equipment loans to Tuckerman Brewery, enabling the company to move, expand, and double its full-time workforce.
It was called “monumental,” “pioneering,” and “the most important affordable housing project in New England,” but when the recession hit, the Gile Hill housing development faced foreclosure. The Community Loan Fund stepped in with flexible capital to keep the project afloat.
Derek Cornell and Kim Kirk aren't afraid of hard work. Leading a cooperative effort to buy and manage their North Country manufactured-home park was the right thing to do because "good people live here and we want them to have a good place to live.”
The Scanlons were among the many thousands of homeowners crushed by the recession of the late 2000s. Bankrupt and heartbroken, living in a tiny subsidized apartment, they reached out to the Community Loan Fund. Five weeks later, they were homeowners.